Our Artisans

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 Felipe Salomon is a 35-year-old shoemaker born and raised in Pastores. He studied to become an electrician in high school before switching to cobbling in his mid-twenties. Now, he sews for the Granada, Merida, Havana, and Santiago.

Felipe Salomon is a 35-year-old shoemaker...

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Born the son of coffee pickers or “campesinos” in Pastores, Horacio Alvarez began working in his uncle’s boot shop at eight-years-old. He was the first in his family to attend college — he studied psychology at San Carlos University of Guatemala — before returning to Pastores to open Horacio’s Boots, just one block from his childhood home. Horacio loves to travel his beautiful country and read novels by Brazilian author Paulo Coelho.

Horacio Alvarez began working in his uncle’s boot shop...

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Miguel lives with his family in the town of Antigua, just east of Pastores. He learned the art of shoemaking from his father at the age of 16. Miguel is an “ensuelador,” meaning that he focuses on building the leather soles for our Valparaiso, Villa, Imperial, and Clasico styles. He enjoys playing soccer on the local field and is a prolific scorer.

Miguel lives with his family in the town of Antigua...

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Danilo Galdamez is a third generation shoemaker and small business owner from San Juan de lo Vispo. He manages his own shoe brand, Zapato Galdamez, and hopes to transition the family business to one of his two sons in the future. Ever a pragmatist, Danilo loves to talk craft shoemaking and logistics.

Danilo Galdamez is a third generation shoemaker and small business owner...

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Joaquin was born on August 16 1945 in Antigua, which he notes was just days before the end of World War II. He has three children with his wife, Gloria, and three grandchildren — all girls. Joaquin has handcrafted shoes for 50 years, which is the same amount of time that he and Gloria have been married.

Joaquin was born on August 16 1945 in Antigua...




The Living Well Line

We pay our craftsmen enough to consume the goods and services that they deem necessary to Live Well with their families. There’s nothing radical about it, just a fair price for work well done. To arrive at the Living Well Line in Pastores, we crosscheck Guatemala-specific data from the World Bank’s Living Standard Measurement Study with in-person craftsman interviews



Here’s how the Living Well Line stacks up relative to the Minimum Wage and Fair Trade Wage in Pastores, Guatemala:

 

Transparency and Accountability

You worked hard for your money, and deserve to know where it goes. We want you to hold us accountable, so we back our values with financial transparency. Take a look at the below breakdown of what it takes to make a pair of Adelantes.